lardbucket: now you tell me

3/13/2017

Now You Tell Me

Filed under: Travel — Andy @ 6:24 pm

I’m apparently getting a bit more lax in remembering to take photos of foods, so my breakfast photo is a bit odd. Cereal and bacon this morning.


There were two main rentable bikes we’ve seen around. The tour guide from our Great Wall trip indicated that they both have combination locks on the rear wheel, as well as a QR code. If you scan the QR code with the right app, you’ll get the combination for the bike, and can unlock it and use it. There’s some hourly fee, apparently, but the first half hour is free (and possibly longer in some circumstances?). Apparently when you’re done, you just leave the bike in an obvious location (generally, next to a bunch of others of the same color/company), and take another scan of the QR code. We couldn’t figure out how this actually did anything other than stop charging you, as there didn’t appear to be any way to automatically lock the bike, or to track it. (Just not enough space for a decent battery and transceiver.) Apparently you pay a deposit, but the bikes appear to cost more than the deposit, so there may just be an honor system component (and/or the threat of being banned or facing legal action).

Anyway, we saw a new set of bikes out on the sidewalk today, in a bright green in contrast to the existing red or yellow bikes. These appeared to have a solar panel on them, and may be able to track themselves, and lock or unlock on their own, but we didn’t take the time to investigate. (Aside: paying for things in China is interesting. They largely still use cash, but their 100 yuan note is the largest in circulation, and trades for about $15-16, so you may need a number of them to pay for even a meal with a couple co-workers. Lots of places now accept WeChat – QR codes and some sort of bank orchestration – to avoid cash, but it’s very difficult for a foreigner to set up such an account. You appear to need a Chinese bank account, which is a bit difficult to set up, and may have to validate your identity somehow. So for most of us, it’s just cash.)


For lunch, I went with the noodles again. And again, this photo is a bit late, coming after I’d drained much of the broth. This time around, I got Xiao to order them without cilantro, which was nice.


For dinner, we went to what is apparently a chain restaurant called Big Pizza, at Alvaro’s suggestion. (Contrast Big Pizza with It’s Pizza a couple blocks away: the latter didn’t have any pizza in the dishes they advertised.)

Anyway, it’s apparently a pizza buffet, somewhat like Cici’s for those who know it in the US, but with fewer pizzas at a time and plenty more options. This ran about $10 US, which makes it a bit more than the minimum for a restaurant dinner here, but still far less than many places we’ve been.


Their labels are in English where they exist, but many are missing, hence me getting a banana custard cup while expecting a small quiche-like thing.


Alvaro and I agreed that the pizza available here was much better than that at Yummy Box. I had been warned that one of the pizzas was probably a durian pizza they were advertising, so I ended up getting that to try as well. It’s the top slice here (the other is plain cheese):


Also of note: drinks were included in the price of admission. That included a Pepsi fountain, as well as juices, soy milk, and surprisingly, bottles of beer (though it was all one beer with 2.5% ABV).


I didn’t get a picture of the rest of the selection, but there was a salad bar, a small fondue station, ice cream, chilled puddings, sushi, skewered and breaded meats, fried rice, and probably a few more things. The focus was on pizza, but the other items offered a decent variety while waiting on a new pizza. They also offered a “DIY” pizza counter where we assume you could order whatever you wanted, but it appeared as though you pretty much had to speak Mandarin to give it a go, and the pepperoni pizza was fine. 

We had what appeared to be a full moon for my second to last night in Beijing. 

No Comments »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a comment

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

My Stuff
Blog Stuff
Categories
Archives